Kids, don’t try this at home (or anywhere else for that matter)!

Today I finished Spencer’s nap mat for K4. The last time I did this was for Hanna. I was so traumatized that decided to purchase one for Emma from Pottery Barn Kids rather than make one again. It was her or me — I decided I would be much more scarred by making another nap mat than she would be if she ever realized that I didn’t actually sew her mat. It was a risk I was willing to take.

Fast forward to this year where I convinced myself that I could indeed tackle this project again. Moments in life like this are where video cameras are handy. If, for example, people did their own family “Reality TV”  rather than just videoing birthday parties and beach vacations, they would capture things like the last time I tried to make a nap mat — which would have reminded me of all the reasons I haven’t made one since.

So why is it such a torturous event you ask? The answer my friends is one word — “batting.”  Now for those of you fortunate enough not to be acquainted with this substance, let me introduce you.  Batting is used by crafty people (and desperate mothers trying to make nap mats before school starts) to create fluffy, quilted surfaces by stuffing it inbetween layers of fabric (like a sandwich) and sewing.

Therein lies the problem. 

For people with sewing machines designed for quilting (and other crafty stitching that requires the use of batting) this might not present such a challenge, but for my dainty sewing and embroidery machine . . . well, I think I owe my Viking Iris an apology (and potentially a trip to the dealer for an annual service).

If I’ve inspired you at all, I really do apologize. Really. Do yourself a favor and buy one — it almost doesn’t matter where, just do it. However, because I know that no one ever reads these warnings, instead only looking at the adorable finished product (and yes, it really is) I offer this final tip to those considering sewing a nap mat at home.  Seriously, *seriously* evaluate mounting your quilt-ready sewing machine on a ping pong table — or you will also experience the joy of wadded up fabric, fleece, batting and PINS in your lap as you sew.

Yes, I’m here to help.